FAU welcomes back on-campus events with Super Smash Bros. tournament

“The biggest thing is that when you’re finding friends, they have to have common interests, and everyone having a common interest in Smash Bros. is pretty dope,” senior business marketing major Quinn Mowlam said.

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Students participate in the Esports Arena’s Super Smash Bros. tournament. Photo by Eston Parker III.

Colby Guy, Editor-In-Chief

On-campus events are back at FAU, and one of them is a weekly Super Smash Bros Ultimate tournament, which takes place every Thursday, at the Esports Arena in the Student Union.

On Thursday, Jan. 21, students participated in a socially-distanced tournament, where they competed against each other in different rooms in the Student Union lobby. Each competition room has a maximum capacity of five people, while the bigger training room has a maximum capacity of ten people.

Equipment in these rooms is to be sanitized often and students must wear a mask at all times to participate.

To enter the competition, students must pay a $5 entry fee and the winner of the tournament wins a prize.

With a competitive, yet safe atmosphere to go to, students are excited to have this opportunity to do what they love and meet people who share that interest: video games.

“The biggest thing is that when you’re finding friends, they have to have common interests, and everyone having a common interest in Smash Bros. is pretty dope,” senior business marketing major Quinn Mowlam said.

Students enjoy having that competitive atmosphere, and in some cases, it’s been giving them more of a challenge, which they’ve enjoyed.

“I just like knowing that there are other big gamers out there,” freshman nursing student Tony Rolle said. “I thought I was the only one who really played Super Smash Brothers and some of these guys are better than me.”

Mowlam agrees that that challenge has been a welcome one, making him enjoy the game he loves even more.

“When you play in a party with a bunch of people, you just destroy everyone,” Mowlam said. “Now, you’re actually playing people who are hood and then also might get destroyed and it’s a nice change of pace.”

Colby Guy is the Editor-In-Chief for the University Press. For information regarding this or other stories, email [email protected] or tweet him @thatguycolbs