Meet Melissa Carasa, the unopposed SG Broward gubernatorial candidate

Carasa wants to get students involved in Student Government.

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Meet Melissa Carasa, the unopposed SG Broward gubernatorial candidate

Melissa Carasa, Broward's only gubernatorial candidate. Photo courtesy of Melissa Carasa.

Melissa Carasa, Broward's only gubernatorial candidate. Photo courtesy of Melissa Carasa.

Melissa Carasa, Broward's only gubernatorial candidate. Photo courtesy of Melissa Carasa.

Melissa Carasa, Broward's only gubernatorial candidate. Photo courtesy of Melissa Carasa.

Arturo Arias, Contributing Writer

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While Student Government candidates have been campaigning this entire month with elections next week, not all students are putting up posters and passing out pins. The University Press sat down with Melissa Carasa, who is currently running unopposed for the Student Government Broward governor’s seat, to get to know her platform better.

Carasa’s overall mission statement is to improve interactivity between the student, faculty, and leaders populating the Davie campus by planning different events that help bring students and faculty closer, such as luncheons with faculty of each college and SG representatives.

Her other objectives include tightening campus security, promoting diversity and inclusivity amongst different cultures, incorporating campus health programs, and repurposing environments for students by reimagining spaces by moving furniture or repurposing other existing assets in the Student Union building.

“I wanted to be part of campus life and being part of that bridge between the students and our college, bringing them closer together, and getting students really engaged and enjoying what we have to offer on campus,” Carasa said.

She lists her five pillars as outreach, safety and security, diversity and inclusion, well-being, and student spaces. Here’s what they mean:

  • Outreach is to improve interaction between the students and student government and get them interested in SG
  • Safety and security is for creating pathways to connect students with the campus police to feel supported and safe on campus
  • Diversity and inclusion will be accomplished by creating different events that promote acceptance, awareness, and inclusivity
  • Well-being is to ensure students are aware of health services on campus
  • Student spaces would reimagine and repurpose the environment to suit students such as adding more active programming space for the Davie Student Union.

Carasa transferred from Nova Southeastern University to FAU this spring semester. She regrets not being involved with the student body during her time at NSU, and sees running for governor as an opportunity to get involved.

She has had no experience serving the Broward House of Representatives, but was a member of Women of Tomorrow, a mentoring program that helps young women transform their lives and lead towards a better future.

Despite running unopposed, Carasa said she still feels the same as if there were other candidates. She still feels the need to campaign and be elected. However, this situation also gave Carasa additional motivation to run for Broward governor, as she felt that the opportunity was telling her to do this.

“This was meant for me,” she said. “While running for Governor and having worked with SG and Campus Life, I have had the opportunity to talk and meet with many involved students on our campus that reflect our current campus community we have of student leaders.”

Student Government elections are from midnight on Feb. 26 until Feb. 27 at 11:59 p.m. on Owl Central.

Arturo Arias is a contributing writer with the University Press. For information regarding this or other stories, email [email protected].