Student affairs vice president resigns from university Friday

Corey King will act as President John Kelly’s adviser until his replacement is found.

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Student affairs vice president resigns from university Friday

Corey King stepped down Friday from his post as vice president of student affairs. Photo courtesy of Student Affairs marketing

Corey King stepped down Friday from his post as vice president of student affairs. Photo courtesy of Student Affairs marketing

Corey King stepped down Friday from his post as vice president of student affairs. Photo courtesy of Student Affairs marketing

Corey King stepped down Friday from his post as vice president of student affairs. Photo courtesy of Student Affairs marketing

Kristen Grau, Managing Editor

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Vice President of Student Affairs Corey King informed President John Kelly he will be stepping down on Friday, according to an email statement from Kelly. 

King told the University Press his reason was “professional opportunities” via email, but didn’t specify what those were. He’s served at the university for 11 years.

While FAU searches for a replacement, King will serve as Kelly’s “special adviser” on “student-related matters” and Dean of Students Larry Faerman will fill King’s place. 

King was considering this decision for several months, he said in an email. He is “exploring opportunities” for new jobs. 

He was appointed vice president of student affairs in 2015. Since his tenure at FAU, he’s also been associate vice president and dean of students. 

One of King’s programs was the Urban Male Institute (UMI), an annual event at FAU, where men can network and develop leadership skills, FAU’s site says. To help one student who was living in his car, King used a stipend from UMI to cover his housing costs, the University Press previously reported

King chronicled his time at FAU by posting selfies with students and faculty at nearly every event to Twitter. 

He also advised the Florida Board of Governors, a 17-member group that makes major financial decisions for Florida’s 12 public state universities, on issues regarding enrollment, student involvement, and safety.

This is a developing story. Check back with the University Press for updates. Kristen Grau is the managing editor of the University Press. For information regarding this or other stories, email [email protected] or tweet her @_kristengrau.