Boca campus entrance loses dozens of trees

Why? To protect a canal.

A+view+of+the+canal+running+alongside+Glades+Road.+It+stretches+from+in+front+of+Parliament+to+Indian+River+Towers.+Photo+by+Kerri+Covington+
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Boca campus entrance loses dozens of trees

A view of the canal running alongside Glades Road. It stretches from in front of Parliament to Indian River Towers. Photo by Kerri Covington

A view of the canal running alongside Glades Road. It stretches from in front of Parliament to Indian River Towers. Photo by Kerri Covington

A view of the canal running alongside Glades Road. It stretches from in front of Parliament to Indian River Towers. Photo by Kerri Covington

A view of the canal running alongside Glades Road. It stretches from in front of Parliament to Indian River Towers. Photo by Kerri Covington

Cameren Boatner, News Editor

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Behind the trees lining Glades Road near FAU’s main entrance, there sits a small, hidden canal frequented by the campus ducks.

And to protect it from fallen debris, a division of the state government stepped in and cut down the surrounding trees. The project started in early May.

The Lake Worth Drainage District, which manages water resources for parts of Palm Beach County, is responsible for the project.

District director Tommy Strowd said the trees, known as Australian Pines, were a “hazard.” Their fast growing roots clogged the canal and the trees themselves are easily blown over.

A map showing Glades Road and the trees that were cut down. Photo courtesy of the Lake Worth Drainage District

This could restrict canal access if there was “emergency work” needed.  The canal stretches from in front of Indian River Towers to Parliament. 

“It’s not uncommon for Australian Pines to topple over, and if they fell into a canal, it could be a blockage to the flow of water,” he said.

And that’s exactly what happened in September 2017 when Hurricane Irma hit.

Strowd said his district’s work on the canal came to a screeching halt. Because of the debris that needed to be collected, work stopped for four months.

Now, there are no remaining trees lining the canal. Thankfully, Strowd said, they weren’t home to any wildlife.

It’s not clear when the project will be finished though, at least according to the company responsible for cutting down the trees.

An Arbor Tree and Land Corporation representative, who chose to remain anonymous, said they will be “finished when they’re finished.”

Check back with the University Press for updates.

Cameren Boatner is the news editor of the University Press. For information regarding this or other stories, email [email protected].