James Tracy’s controversial blog shut down

Web hosting company suspends former communication professor’s website for an undisclosed terms of service violation.

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James Tracy’s controversial blog shut down

James Tracy claimed that FAU fired him because of controversial conspiracy theories he shared on his blog. Photo by Michelle Friswell

James Tracy claimed that FAU fired him because of controversial conspiracy theories he shared on his blog. Photo by Michelle Friswell

James Tracy claimed that FAU fired him because of controversial conspiracy theories he shared on his blog. Photo by Michelle Friswell

James Tracy claimed that FAU fired him because of controversial conspiracy theories he shared on his blog. Photo by Michelle Friswell

Joe Pye, News Editor

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A former communication professor who claims he was fired from Florida Atlantic for having his free speech rights violated has had his website silenced, for now.

James Tracy’s Memory Hole Blog was temporarily shut down by web hosting company Bluehost, according to a tweet from Tracy’s Twitter account on Nov. 23.

Visitors to the site now receive a message that states: “This site has been archived or suspended for a violation of our Terms of Service.”

According to its privacy policy, Bluehost is not allowed to comment to third parties on the statuses of other users’ domains.

The blog brought Tracy national attention due to his claims that the Sandy Hook massacre and several other mass shooting incidents were hoaxes carried out by the U.S. government.

Tracy previously taught in the School of Communication and Multimedia Studies for 14 years before being terminated in December of 2015 for not submitting a “Report of Outside Employment or Professional Activity Form,” which lists any extra money an employee makes outside of the university, such as freelance or coaching jobs. The form was required by the faculty collective bargaining agreement.

Tracy filed a lawsuit on April 26 in federal court against the university and faculty union after claiming that the school wrongly terminated him for practicing his First Amendment rights.

The University Press reached out to Tracy for comment, but did not receive a response as of publication time.

Joe Pye is the news editor of the University Press. For information regarding this or other stories, email [email protected] or tweet him @jpeg3189