Greeks walk to raise breast cancer awareness

Phi+Beta+Sigma.+Photo+by+Regina+Kaza.

Phi Beta Sigma. Photo by Regina Kaza.

Regina Kaza

Phi Beta Sigma. Photo by Regina Kaza.

FAU’s Pi Kappa Alpha pulled an all-nighter blowing up thousands of pink balloons. The fight against breast cancer kept them going.

On Oct. 22, FAU sororities and fraternities walked three miles in Mizner Park as part of Making Strides Against Breast Cancer, which claims to have raised over $400 million for the American Cancer Society since 1993.

Pi Kappa Alpha (the Pikes) didn’t walk, but worked for two days setting up the event. Some sororities and fraternities, like Phi Beta Sigma (PBS), strolled in teams while others came to support the cause and their fellow sorority and fraternity members

“Breast cancer affects everyone. Everyone has a mother or a sister that can get it,” said Zeta Phi Beta President Krystal Muckle. She attended with three other ZPB sorority members, supporting breast cancer survivors. “We want to bring awareness and get people to get tested to make sure nothing is wrong.”

Pi Kappa Alpha. Photo by Regina Kaza.

ZPB tagged along with PBS. The latter raised $300, according to former PBS President Alvin Johnson, who walked with his former fraternity.

“Breast Cancer affects everyone. It’s not only women, but guys too, and we’re a fraternity that cares about everyone,” said PBS Secretary Junior Damis.

PBS member Adler Marchard commented, “I don’t know anyone that had it, but it is something that’s common around us. I’m sure in the near future I’ll know someone with it. It affects everyone.”

Over 40 Pikes were up since 4 a.m. to set up the event, and they stayed until the end near noon. According to Pike Community Service Chairperson, Gabriel Calderon, they set up chairs, carried about 15,000 packs of water and put up the balloons that decorated the plaza.

Zeta Phi Beta. Photo by Regina Kaza.

“We help them out every year, it’s an annual thing. They love us, we do a really good job,” said Calderon.

Pike member Theo Vlass has an aunt who survived breast cancer. “I still call my aunt every time I go. It’s an awesome event. Everyone gets out and has a good time.” He believes it’s good for bonding and allows potential new members to get involved.

“Even though it’s a serious issue, you still see people with smiles on their faces and it’s just a great cause.”