Lama ‘Love’

FEATURE

Michael “Love” sat outside The Burrow on the Boca campus (FAU Arena) right before the Dalai Lama’s lecture, strumming his ukulele and singing “Over the Rainbow.”

He’s a nomad, and he was looking for tickets to see His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama. Accompanied by Karen Scubrine from Arkansas, they were hoping to “be blessed” with two donated tickets. 

Michael is part of a group of nomadic people called the Rainbow Family of Living Light. He walked around barefoot with a piece of notebook paper in his hand that said: “Need two tickets for Dalai Lama.” Outside of The Burrow, he hugged strangers and gave them pieces of quartz crystals.

“It’s full of love,” said Michael when handing them out.

Scubrine met Michael in Ocala at a Florida Rainbow Gathering (an assembly of Rainbow members that prays for peace and healing in the world) early this February. Although she currently lives in her car, she decided to bring Michael along with her to see His Holiness.

“It was his wish,” said Scubrine. “He wanted to see the Dalai Lama.”

Shortly after, sounds of police sirens filled the streets of Broward Avenue. Michael and Scubrine ran to the back of The Burrow, hoping to get a glance of the Tibetan religious figure. Police cars and motorcycles lined up in front of and behind the limo parked there. His Holiness had arrived. 

Michael and Scubrine dropped to their knees at the first glance they got of him. They quickly got back up and praised him with their affection.

“We love you,” cried Scubrine.

His Holiness smiled and bowed to them. After the Dalai Lama walked into the building, Michael crumbled up his piece of paper and smiled. He didn’t need a ticket. He got what he came to see — His Holiness. 

“That was spectacular,” he said, and he smiled to Scubrine.

 

Meet the Rainbow Family

The Rainbow Family of Living Light is a group of people who meet at different state and national parks around the U.S. to pray for peace and love on earth. The words “Rainbow Family” in their title refer to people of all colors and races that are welcomed in their tribe. The words “Living Light” reinforce their goal of “living lightly” by having small carbon footprints that don’t impact the environment.