Marjory Stoneman Douglas memorial items stored at FAU

The mementos left by members of the community were boxed up by volunteers for safekeeping.

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Marjory Stoneman Douglas memorial items stored at FAU

The entrance of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

The entrance of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

The entrance of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

The entrance of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Genesis Cubas and Hope Dean

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The Marjory Stoneman Douglas memorial has been taken down as of March 28 and will be stored at FAU’s Boca Raton campus, according to WSVN.

The City of Parkland and the Parkland Historical Society teamed up to store the items that extended all the way up to the corner of Pine Island and Holmberg roads outside the school.

Hundreds of momentos were packed up, including plaques, stuffed animals, notes, and other items that were left by the community to remember the lives of the 17 students who were killed in the school shooting on February 14.

It was the eighth most deadly shooting in modern U.S. history, and the third most deadly shooting in the past six months, according to Fox News.

Taking the memorial apart was challenging for the volunteers, and some were left in tears as they worked. In place of the items, 17 flower beds in the shape of hearts were planted by the entrance to the school.

“We want this stuff to be here in 100 years, 150 years, so that people can look back and see not only what took place, unfortunately, but what was left behind by the community and the hearts and tears that were poured out,” said Parkland Historical Society President Jeff Schwartz to WSVN.

The items have been temporarily placed in climate-controlled storage in the Wimberly Library, and the library’s curator and archivist are in charge of caring for the collection while it’s under their care, Schwartz said via email.

Genesis Cubas is a contributing writer with the University Press. For information regarding this or other stories, email [email protected].

Hope Dean is the features editor of the University Press. For information regarding this or other stories, email [email protected].