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18 Years Out: Death row exoneree Seth Penalver speaks at Florida Atlantic

Death row exoneree Seth Penalver came to campus last Tuesday to speak about his experiences on death row.

Death+row+exoneree+Seth+Penalver+spoke+to+over+400+FAU+students+and+staff+Tuesday+night.+Brittany+Ferrendi+%7C+Features+Editor
Death row exoneree Seth Penalver spoke to over 400 FAU students and staff Tuesday night. Brittany Ferrendi | Features Editor

Death row exoneree Seth Penalver spoke to over 400 FAU students and staff Tuesday night. Brittany Ferrendi | Features Editor

Death row exoneree Seth Penalver spoke to over 400 FAU students and staff Tuesday night. Brittany Ferrendi | Features Editor

Brittany Ferrendi, Features Editor

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Former death row inmate Seth Penalver, who spent 18 years in prison before his exoneration, spoke to students and staff on the Boca campus Tuesday night.

“He actually changed my mind on the view of death penalty,” said Marissa Buchanan, a junior majoring in criminal justice. “I wasn’t pro death, but I wasn’t against it; my views were mixed.”

Close to 450 seats in the Grand Palm Room were entirely filled by students and staff, with a dozen others standing up in the back of the room.

Professor Cassandra Atkin-Plunk, who specializes in studying corrections and helped organize the event, opened the floor to Penalver’s public speech.

Penalver was accused of committing a 1994 triple murder in Broward County. He missed a meeting with detectives due to a personal emergency. From there forward, they were no longer interested in talking to him.

On Aug. 3, 1994, Penalver felt his options were drained. “I turned myself in, and that’s where my nightmare began,” he told the audience.

According to NBC Miami, Penalver was tried twice alongside his co-defendant, Pablo Ibar. The first ended with a gridlocked jury and a mistrial, and the second trial sentenced him to the death penalty in 1999.

While in prison, Penalver turned to faith — he became a life coach and a minister. “I found God in there,” he said.

He also turned to the legal system when he realized that people could receive new trials when police officers and prosecutors withhold evidence. “While people were buying candy, I was buying law books, because this can’t be the end,” the exoneree told the audience.

Penalver eventually discovered that the prosecutor and police held back information that may have proved his innocence.

“When I saw some of the stuff they withheld, I broke down,” he said. “Like, why? Why would you do this?”

In 2012 — after spending almost half of his life in prison — Penalver’s charge was overthrown by the Florida Supreme Court due to improper evidence at his trial.

According to the death row exoneree, one of the witnesses was bribed into giving a false testimony.

“They were paid — they were paid to say something and we didn’t know that until 17 and a half years later,” he told the silent audience.

His co-defendant, Ibar, still remains on death row.

Penalver is the 142th person to be exonerated from death row, and the 24th person in Florida alone. “Imagine the ones we don’t know about that were killed,” he added.

On whether the death penalty should be permissible, Penalver said: “It’s either you have it or you don’t, and even one person is too many if you got it wrong.”

In addition to public speaking and ministering, Penalver reaches out to juveniles at Miami’s Turner Guilford Knight Correctional Center — an adult jail that houses minors based on their crimes.

Penalver gave advice to students interested in the criminal justice field: “Don’t manufacture what you don’t have,” he said. “That’s what happened to me.”  

ACJA members Penalver and Atkin-Plunk pose for a photo following the event. Brittany Ferrendi | Features Editor

ACJA members Penalver and Atkin-Plunk pose for a photo following the event. Brittany Ferrendi | Features Editor

Penalver was invited to campus by the Beta Phi chapter of the American Criminal Justice Association at FAU. The ACJA Beta Phi chapter and Atkin-Plunk chose Penalver to shed light onto a different side of the criminal justice system.

“I believe this is important because many of our students aspire to be law enforcement officers or prosecutors, and as such they should realize the gravity of these positions and how they could potentially affect people’s lives,” President of ACJA  Brandon Karns told the UP.

After his speech, Penalver took a Q&A session with the audience. Once that concluded, about 30 students and staff lined up to speak with him personally.

“It was a different perspective — I’ve always been neutral on the death row because I’ve had corrections and ethics [classes] so my perspective can be very different,” said Amanda Carrasquillo, a senior criminal justice major who is a part of ACJA. “Whether death row is still enrolled, whether it’s harsher, whether it’s not there anymore, I feel that as our generation we can all grow and develop from this speaker.”

Brittany Ferrendi is the features editor of the University Press. For information regarding this or other stories, email [email protected] or tweet her @BFerrendi.

About the Writer
Brittany Ferrendi, Features Editor - Spring
Brittany is an English major with a minor in criminal justice. She started working at the University Press in December 2015 and became features editor in early 2016. She has freelanced for publications including The Palm Beach Post and NewBeauty Magazine. Brittany is also a webmaster and staff writer for South Florida Gay News. You...
6 Comments

6 Responses to “18 Years Out: Death row exoneree Seth Penalver speaks at Florida Atlantic”

  1. Seth on April 28th, 2016 12:15 am

    TRUTH ONLY KNOWS TRUTH…
    12-21-2012
    SETH PENALVER
    FLORIDA DEATH ROW EXONOREE #24
    U.S. DEATH ROW EXONOREE #142

  2. Martin McFaddin on March 17th, 2017 6:37 am

    The witness wasn’t bribed to give false testimony as Mr. Penalver “mistakenly” asserts.He was given a reward offered by crime stoppers that anyone with information would have received.The man was Penalvers former room mate at the time and he denied being given money for his testimony as did a Detective because they considered this a reward for information and not a quid pro quo.Mr. Penalver was also seen by several witnesses the evening of the triple murder in the male victims night club with the other defendant,Pablo Ibar,who has won a new trial as well,but was apprehended a short time later committing a home invasion robbery exactly like this one in the act.He has written about Penalvers guilt on more than one occasion and after his retrial,and the subsequent appeals process has intimated he would write a book concerning this whole sordid affair.Mr. Penalver was found not guilty 18 years after the fact,which is not the same as being found innocent and there wasn’t any public statements by the jury or Judge about Penalvers innocence as he has constantly intimated since.There was some shoddy police work and the failure to collect DNA evidence or offer Mr. Ibar a deal taking the death sentence off the table was a huge mistake.Ibar was already undoubtedly guilty of the second home invasion,which in itself would carry an extremely lengthy prison term.Regardless the families of the three victims are the ones I truly feel for,because has the police not merely relied on a video tape of the 22 minute murder and robbery,perhaps they would have used every investigative tool at their disposal and the families would have received closure of some kind.18 years after a crime is committed is a very long time to gain a guilty verdict,particularly without DNA evidence and a crime stoppers reward that should have been identified as such at the time of the first trial.Being rewarded for evidence by crimestoppers is hardly a pay off and is still used to this day due to its affectiveness.Mr. Penalver hasn’t been rewarded any financial award for the years he was supposedly wrongly incarcerated due to prosecutorial misconduct and after five years won’r be.

  3. Sharon Whites on April 2nd, 2017 9:18 am

    I Lost my Friends, and these boys haven’t changed.. They will do it again. Don’t use God as a Tool, because if you was so rightous, you would have owned up to the true.. May your coharts, family and friends exprience what we have.. You are Both disgusting for what you did to my Friends.. May Nick, Sharon and Marie RIP, Love Always to them..

  4. Jean-Francois Tessier on May 11th, 2017 12:58 pm

    I am the witness who was “bribed”, Mr Klimeczko, and it is not true. I lived with Pablo at the time and Seth and Pablo ruthlessly murdered these people and it’s so sad to see Seth not only go free, but continue to play this charade. If he had any conscience whatsoever, he would fade into obscurity.

  5. Deborah Anderson on December 2nd, 2017 5:54 pm

    Seth, stop parading yourself all over Florida with your lies. You gamed the system for a murder you committed, period. Any stupid person who believes your insane story needs their head examined.

    But do know, Seth, judgment comes to us all.

    Sharon Anderson’s duster, Debbie

  6. Deborah Anderson on December 2nd, 2017 5:55 pm

    Seth, stop parading yourself all over Florida with your lies. You gamed the system for a murder you committed, period. Any stupid person who believes your insane story needs their head examined.

    But do know, Seth, judgment comes to us all.

    Sharon Anderson’s sister, Debbie

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