FAU Honors the loss of three faculty members with flags at half-staff

Austen Erblat

Professors Stephen Voss of the College of Education, William Glenn (pictured) of the College of Engineering and Computer Science, and Harley Flanders of the mathematics department passed away last month. This week, FAU is honoring them with flags at half-staff. Photo courtesy of FAU.
Professors William Glenn (pictured) of the College of Engineering and Computer Science, Stephen Voss of the College of Education, and Harley Flanders of the mathematics department passed away last month. This week, FAU is honoring them with flags at half-staff. Photo courtesy of FAU.

Three Florida Atlantic University professors passed away last month and, this week, FAU is honoring them with flags at half-staff.

 Professors Stephen Voss of the College of Education, William Glenn of the College of Engineering and Computer Science, and Harley Flanders of the mathematics department passed away last month after providing huge contributions to the university.

According to FAUToday, “The FAU flags are lowered to half-staff on the first Monday of every month to memorialize those who passed away the month before or in the recent past.”

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Stephen Voss was born in Miami on September 19, 1925. He joined the Navy and served in World War II, where he was a part of the Invasion of Normandy as well as the Invasion of Okinawa as a combat medic in the 6th Naval Beach Battalion.

 Voss attended Florida Southern College in Lakeland and later earned his masters and doctorate degrees at the University of Florida. He became a teacher in 1953 and continued to teach until the time he died.

He was a part of the founding faculty at FAU when the university was first founded in 1964 and helped establish the College of Education. He served as an official academic adviser to FAU students preparing to become elementary school teachers.

Voss led the processions of over 150 graduations at FAU as University Marshall according to his biography on Gary Panoch Funeral Homes’ website. He was 87 when he passed away on July 8.

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William Glenn was born on May 12, 1926 in Atlanta, Ga. He joined the Navy after World War II as an enlisted officer. Afterward, he received his Bachelor of Electrical Engineering degree from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1946, and his masters degree and Ph.D. in the same field from the University of California at Berkeley in 1952.

 Glenn started working for General Electric in 1952, where he developed two new types of electro-optical imaging systems. He left GE in 1967 to become the vice president and director of research at CBS Laboratories, Inc., and in 1975, Glenn became the director of the Science and Technology Research Center at the New York Institute of Technology.

Glenn joined the faculty at FAU in 1989 as a research professor, and was a professor of electrical and computer engineering. He also served as the director of the Imaging Technology Center, including the NASA Imaging Technology Space Center.

Glenn offered countless innovations, achievements and contributions in the fields of high resolution imaging technology, electronic and optical physics and electrical engineering, according to a press release from FAU. He was the head of FAU’s Imaging Technology Center and NASA Imaging Technology Commercial Space Center . He has been awarded more than 137 U.S. patents and has published more than 100 technical articles.

“Dr. Glenn was a gifted researcher and is responsible for introducing new capabilities that have become the foundation of our current technologies in the fields of education, entertainment, communications and medical imaging,” said Borko Furht, Ph.D., chair and professor of the department of Computer and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. “He will be greatly missed.”

Glenn was 87 when he died on July 13.

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Harley Flanders was born September 13, 1925 in Chicago. He got his PhD in mathematics at the University of Chicago in 1949. Until 1960 he was a professor at the University of California, Berkeley. During this time, he was a National Science Foundation Fellow at Cambridge and Hebrew University. In 1960 he was appointed full professor at Purdue and later at Tel Aviv University.

In 1977 he returned to the United States where he held several positions, most recently as a visiting scholar at the University of Michigan. Harley authored a book on differential forms, numerous scientific papers and a number of textbooks on algebra, trigonometry, calculus and scientific pascal.

Flanders served pro bono on the mathematics faculty in the Charles E. Schmidt College of Science from 1978 to 1985 where he served as editor-in-chief of the American Mathematical Monthly.

Flanders was also 87 when he died on July 26.