Hannibal Buress headlines Homecoming Comedy Show

Three comedians took the stage during the week’s event

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Hannibal Buress headlines Homecoming Comedy Show

Hannibal Buress headlines the Homecoming Comedy Show on Oct. 26 in the Carole and Barry Kaye Performing Arts Auditorium. Mohammed F Emran | Asst. Creative Director

Hannibal Buress headlines the Homecoming Comedy Show on Oct. 26 in the Carole and Barry Kaye Performing Arts Auditorium. Mohammed F Emran | Asst. Creative Director

Hannibal Buress headlines the Homecoming Comedy Show on Oct. 26 in the Carole and Barry Kaye Performing Arts Auditorium. Mohammed F Emran | Asst. Creative Director

Hannibal Buress headlines the Homecoming Comedy Show on Oct. 26 in the Carole and Barry Kaye Performing Arts Auditorium. Mohammed F Emran | Asst. Creative Director

Ryan Lynch, Sports Editor

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Hannibal Buress kicked off the week by performing to hundreds of students at the Barry Kaye Auditorium Monday night for the annual Homecoming Comedy Show.

Lines stretched out the door before showtime for Buress, who is known for his roles in “Neighbors,”  “Broad City,” “The Eric Andre Show” and his self-titled show “Why? with Hannibal Buress.”

Before the comedians — three in total — Owlsley took the stage, performing a slapstick and dance routine to warm up the crowd. Then, student emcee Aaron Shapiro introduced a Homecoming video contest and introduced the candidates for Homecoming Court.

FAU’s dance team also did a routine, followed by an appearance by head football coach Charlie Partridge and senior captains Cre’von LeBlanc, Sherrod Neasman and Jaquez Johnson to get the crowd excited about the game against Florida International on Oct. 31.

Francisco Duran took the mic as the first opener of the night. The Miami-based comedian had plenty of fat jokes, including those about sex and living as a big man.

Francisco Duran was the first comedian to perform. | Mohammed F Emran Asst. Creative Director

“I might be the fattest dude in here, I don’t know yet,” Duran said, looking into the crowd for other large people to judge.

Duran’s set was followed by Gene Harding, who was born in New York City to West African parents.

“As soon as people know that I’m African, they don’t wanna give me their email,” he said, poking fun at “African Prince” spam emails.

Harding focused his set talking about dating, looking for apartments in New York, weed and watching Sesame Street high. “The block has changed,” he said of the show.

Gene Harding was the second comedian to perform. ”As soon as people find out that you’re African, they don't want to give you their email address.” | Mohammed F Emran, Asst. Creative Director

Gene Harding was the second comedian to perform. ”As soon as people find out that you’re African, they don’t want to give you their email address.” | Mohammed F Emran, Asst. Creative Director

Buress was the final act of the night, with the assembled student body cheering for the much-anticipated comedian.

“I have heard of him before, he’s really funny,” said sophomore business major Elizabeth Rankin.

It cost Homecoming and Program Board $20,000 each to bring Buress to FAU, according to public records. Past UP reports show that Program Board paid a total of $20,000 for comedian Ralphie May.

Buress joked about the football team’s recent loss last Saturday to UTEP: “squad looks like they’re gonna be one and infinity,” he said.

Hannibal Bures tells a joke about a taxi driver and his girlfriend. “You write down his taxi number and call the taxi commission, and then they’re going to find him and then they’re gonna get his foreign ass out of the county… Holy shit dude. Yo, did you just double down on this racism?” | Mohammed F Emran Asst. Creative Director

The comedian kept the laughter coming, joking about getting noticed by fans in public and his recent trip to get LASIK surgery.

“I’m glad I didn’t go blind, that would’ve been ironic, to go blind in my quest for perfect vision,” Buress said of the procedure.

For his finale, Buress joked about rap music and rapped his song “Gibberish Rap” as Owlsley joined him on stage.

Students seemed to enjoy all of the acts that took the stage. One student even injured himself while laughing.

“While I was laughing I chipped my tooth,” said freshman civil engineering major Jesse Vallillo. “I was laughing pretty hard. I felt kind of dumb, but it was a real good show.”

Ryan Lynch is the sports editor of the University Press. For tips regarding this or other articles, he can be contacted at [email protected] or on Twitter.