Sexting, safety and subtlety

Dr.+Hinduja+shows+off+a+consequence+of+posting+information+online.+The+slide+in+question+was+a+result+of+a+teacher+uploading+a+power+point+of+her+sexual+exploits+with+students%2C+rating+them+on+aggression%2C+power%2C+performance+and+the+like.+Photo+by+Allyn+Farach.
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Sexting, safety and subtlety

Dr. Hinduja shows off a consequence of posting information online. The slide in question was a result of a teacher uploading a power point of her sexual exploits with students, rating them on aggression, power, performance and the like. Photo by Allyn Farach.

Dr. Hinduja shows off a consequence of posting information online. The slide in question was a result of a teacher uploading a power point of her sexual exploits with students, rating them on aggression, power, performance and the like. Photo by Allyn Farach.

Dr. Hinduja shows off a consequence of posting information online. The slide in question was a result of a teacher uploading a power point of her sexual exploits with students, rating them on aggression, power, performance and the like. Photo by Allyn Farach.

Dr. Hinduja shows off a consequence of posting information online. The slide in question was a result of a teacher uploading a power point of her sexual exploits with students, rating them on aggression, power, performance and the like. Photo by Allyn Farach.

Allyn Farach

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Dr. Hinduja shows off a consequence of posting information online. The slide in question was a result of a teacher uploading a power point of her sexual exploits with students, rating them on aggression, power, performance and the like. Photo by Allyn Farach.

Everyone gasped and murmured as the images flickered across the screen. It was a power point made by a teacher rating her students’ sexual prowess.

Students streamed into the Kaye Auditorium on Sept. 19 for “Don’t Post Your Rep Away: Text, Sext and Internet Safety,” co-hosted by the Student Government Program Board and Alpha Delta Pi. Dr. Sameer Hinduja, Associate Professor of the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice, spoke about safely using social networks like Facebook, Twitter and Youtube.

Hinduja covered internet safety and advised students how to be careful on what they uploaded, protect their information and avoid online dating abuse.

His presentation included interactive polls where students texted their answers to questions like
“How technologically savvy do you feel you are?”

James Lavia. Photo by Allyn Farach.

Student James Lavia rated himself “pretty safe,” claiming, “I don’t think that my identity would be stolen.”

He also showed the negative consequences of social networking, including messy relationship details and posting about work, especially if you’ve ‘friended’ your bosses and coworkers.

One involved a girl who was complaining about her boss, calling him a “wanker” and a “perv.” He fired her over Facebook. “This person was just getting something off [their] chest,” Hinduja said, showing another post where a girl was talking about how boring her job was. She was also fired over Facebook.

Hinduja said that 80 percent of companies use social media for recruitment. “I just want people to pause before they post…everyone will judge you because of stuff you posted online,” he said.